Quince Jelly

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Quince Jelly

Quince Jelly

is amazing to eat with cheese. It’s not that difficult to make and it goes very well with any hard cheese but also with fruity cheeses like Wensleydale even brie. You can serve this on your cheese board as a paste, or set in any shape you like, as I did.
In some countries they serve this as a sweet with coffee for their guests – especially if they arrive unexpectedly or at short notice as it will last very long time in the fridge or in a cold food larder. I often eat this with my cheese, although I was brought up eating quince jelly as a sweet with coffee.
Often, quince can be very hard but if you find the large ones and the colour of them is very yellow, then it means they are very ripe, although still quite hard, and they smell divine. You can’t really eat them raw (well, I have never tried, and I would not want to either!) but I really love cooking with them, especially in the tagine.

I always make the most of them when they are in season. I just love them, they keep well in the fridge for up to four weeks, and outside of the fridge for about three weeks. When you buy them make sure you pick the best ones, without any spots of brown on them. This way they should last a long time before you need to use them. The ones I get are huge and I make  many dishes out of them.
Let’s see how we make this Quince Jelly.

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Quince Jelly
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Course Desserts
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 12 hrs
Servings
portions
Ingredients
To prepare the quince:
For the puree:
Course Desserts
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 12 hrs
Servings
portions
Ingredients
To prepare the quince:
For the puree:
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
To prepare the quince
  1. Peel the quince, cut in in slices and remove the pips. Then put in the large pan, cover with water add the star anise and then bring to the boil.
  2. After 10 mins turn the heat off, drain the water, then put in a food processor and then blitz well, and set aside.
For the quince jelly:
  1. On a high heat in a deep pan, pour the quince puree, the sugar and the mixed spice and mix well, then bring to the boil.
  2. Stir from time to time and be careful, as it will probably splatter.
  3. After 30 mins the the quince puree should change in colour and then it will shrink. This is a sign that it is cooked. (see the photo)
  4. Oil a shallow baking tray (use as little oil as possible)
  5. Straight away pour the jelly into the prepared tray and make sure it's evenly spread. If you want to add any nuts, this is the time to do it - I only did little and I kept the rest plain.
  6. Now leave in a cool room until for about 12 hrs or in the fridge for 4hrs. Cut to any shape you like
  7. Put the off cuts in a large sauce pan on a medium heat and keep mixing well until you come into a paste. This can be hard but just be patient.
  8. Now pour them in a small plastic containers like the photo, then store them in the fridge for your cheese, they will keep well.
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